New Site Construction Notice

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The Triple R Horse Rescue Gurus are busy at work  redoing our site.

If your speakers are ON and turned up …..

 

Here’s a preview of what’s coming…….

 

 

Please visit our Facebook page to find all the latest rescue news and adoption opportunities.     These are “Live links” to the complete Facebook posts….

 

 

Some Florida horse history. ...

A TRIBUTE TO JOHN NERUD FROM FLBRED.COM (pictured with Dr. Fager) By Carlos E Medina When John Nerud died on Thursday, Florida lost one of the last ties to an era which laid the foundation for Ocala’s development into a thoroughbred breeding center. Nerud was 102 when he died at his home in Old Brookville, N.Y. of heart failure. “His impact was huge. We had two horsemen, in my opinion, who made Ocala into what it is. The first was Elmer Hubeck (who ran Rosemere Farm in the 40s, Ocala’s first thoroughbred farm) and then John Nerud came along and he took it to the next step; took it all the way,” said Charlene Johnson, a longtime thoroughbred writer, who chronicled the state’s thoroughbred history in her book, “Florida Thoroughbred.” In the late 1950s when Nerud and Tartan Farms’ owner William McKnight were planning the farm, Nerud told the chairman of 3M the only places in the country to breed were either Ocala or Lexington, Kentucky. “When McKnight chose Ocala, at first he really was disappointed, but then after being in Florida, he said he couldn’t imagine being anywhere else,” she said. “We’ve had a lot of owners and rich men and women and experienced horsemen with really solid horse skills, but I don't think Ocala and Marion County would have gotten to where it did without Nerud.” His hand is still apparent in the pedigrees of some of the top racehorses in the country today, including this year’s Triple Crown winner American Pharoah. His great-grandsire was Unbridled who was bred by Tartan Farms. But according to Nerud, the best horse he ever had was Dr. Fager, another Tartan homebred. The colt was named after Dr. Charles Fager, a neurosurgeon who removed a blood clot from Nerud’s brain after a track accident. Dr. Fager went on to win an unmatched four championship titles in one year. In 1968, he was voted Horse of the Year, Champion Handicap Horse, Champion Turf Horse, and Champion Sprinter. The colt stood stud at Tartan where he was the leading sire in 1971, the same year he was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. Nerud would be inducted a year later. Dr. Fager died in 1979 and was buried at Tartan Farms, which is now Winding Oaks Farm. Nerud did extensive research before breeding and listened to any theory on producing winners, whether it was body measurements, heart rates or lung capacity, said Bryan Howlett, who worked with Nerud at Tartan and would eventually become its general manager. “He was good with pedigrees. He did a lot of research on pedigrees. He’d come down and we’d sit at a table for days on end matching the mares we had with stallions,” Howlett said. “He’d listen to what people had to say. He was open to that. He’d pick their brains.” Apart from breeding recommendations, however, Nerud had most of his opinions well formed. “He was kind of opinionated. It was his way or kind of like the highway. But he was alright to work for as long as you did your job,” said Howlett, who spent 32 years at Tartan. Johnson also remembers Nerud’s strong personality. “He was old school. He had very strong opinions about everything. That’s what made him who he was and it worked,” she said. Nerud had to grow up fast. He was born in Minatare, Nebraska in 1913 and left home when he was 13. He started riding bulls on the rodeo circuit, but switched to horses when he found out he could earn more. He raced at the bush tracks in Montana, Wyoming, South and North Dakota and Nebraska. By the time he was 18, he was training horses. He served in the U.S. Navy and moved to Florida after World War II where he worked at Hialeah Park. In his life, he held nearly every job available at a track, from groom to jockey’s agent to trainer. Nerud also was one of the founding members of the Breeders' Cup. The annual series of races has grown into one of the richest and most prestigious series in the world with purses of $26 million. “He lived quite a life,” Howlett said. Thanks to the breeding efforts of horsemen like Nerud, the thoroughbred breeding industry in Ocala gained respect and paved the way for the diverse horse breeds and disciplines that now grace the area. He was preceded in death by his wife Charlotte. The two were married for 69 years before her death in 2003. Survivors include a son, Jan Nerud; daughter-in-law, Debra Nerud; and several grandchildren. Funeral arrangements were not immediately announced.

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SHANIA TWAIN RIDES, DANCES & SINGS WITH HER OWN HORSE AT LAS VEGAS SHOW. SUCH AN INCREDIBLE BOND. #stilltheone Shania Twain #incredible #horse #Love #bond

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David Bruns ...

Some alarming news from Jefferson County. Creeping Indigo has been found in Monticello and it is TOXIC to Livestock! Here is the email we received today from Jed Dillard,Jefferson County Livestock and Natural Resources agent, University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences 2729 West Washington Monticello, FL 32344 850-342-0187 The plant is a low growing legume with pink blooms somewhat like clover (Attachment 1)and small bean like seed pods (attachment 2). Leaves contain seven to nine leaflets, and the prostrate stems creep along the soil surface. The plant can also form mats underneath a healthy pasture canopy as shown in www.volusia.org/core/fileparse.php/4179/urlt/Creeping-Indigo.pdf. This will make it even more difficult to find if it migrates to Panhandle pastures. Creeping indigo (Indigofera spicata) should not be confused with hairy indigo (Indigofera hirsuta). Hairy indigo can approach waist high, but creeping indigo will barely rise above the toe of your brogans. Annual lespedeza (Lespedeza striata) (shown in attachment 3, mixed with centipede grass) is similar in appearance, but unrelated and non-toxic. Its prostrate growth habit is similar to creeping indigo, but its leaves are somewhat smaller and have only three leaflets. The stems of the common lespedeza plants I found across the sidewalk were also woodier than the stems of the creeping indigo. Identification of any toxic plant is the first step in its control. For your next move, mechanical control may be a feasible option if the population is small when you find it. If you pull or hoe the plants, make sure you destroy any seeds as well as the plants. Seed can be viable surprisingly early and the stem and leaves remain toxic after they die and dry. The plant has a deep tap root, so mechanical control can be challenging. Chemical control has not been established, but GrazonNext HL at 24 oz. per acre may be effective as it has good control of other legumes. Remember the dead plants in your pasture are still a threat. Manure from animals grazing treated pastures or hay from treated should not be used for compost. Inspect your pastures and lawns for creeping indigo and other toxic plants. Your livestock and your neighbor’s livestock rely on your vigilance. If you suspect you have creeping indigo in your pastures, contact your local County Agent for assistance in identification and management. This plant has been a problem in South and Central Florida and much good information on specifics of toxicity and symptoms . Sharon Gamble. Creeping Indigo (Indigo spicata) - Toxic to Livestock www.volusia.org/core/fileparse.php/4179/urlt/Creeping-Indigo.pdf Dr. Rob MacKay. Creeping Indigo Toxicity largeanimal.vethospitals.ufl.edu/2014/11/03/creeping-indigo-toxicity/ Sellers, Carlisle and Wiggins. South Florida Beef Forage Program. Creeping Indigo: A Small, Yet Lethal Plant sfbfp.ifas.ufl.edu/articles/article_2013_june.shtml Please spread the word to fellow livestock owners and neighbors. Post it however you deem appropriate. This is a problem we want to avoid if at all possible. Contact me if you have any questions. Jed Jed Dillard Jefferson County Livestock and Natural Resources Agent University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences 2729 West Washington Monticello, FL 32344 850-342-0187

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Some alarming news from Jefferson County. Creeping Indigo has been found in Monticello and it is TOXIC to Livestock!

Here is the email we received today from Jed Dillard,Jefferson County Livestock and Natural Resources agent,
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
2729 West Washington
Monticello, FL 32344
850-342-0187


The plant is a low growing legume with pink blooms somewhat like clover (Attachment 1)and small bean like seed pods (attachment 2). Leaves contain seven to nine leaflets, and the prostrate stems creep along the soil surface. The plant can also form mats underneath a healthy pasture canopy as shown in www.volusia.org/core/fileparse.php/4179/urlt/Creeping-Indigo.pdf. This will make it even more difficult to find if it migrates to Panhandle pastures.

Creeping indigo (Indigofera spicata) should not be confused with hairy indigo (Indigofera hirsuta). Hairy indigo can approach waist high, but creeping indigo will barely rise above the toe of your brogans.

Annual lespedeza (Lespedeza striata) (shown in attachment 3, mixed with centipede grass) is similar in appearance, but unrelated and non-toxic. Its prostrate growth habit is similar to creeping indigo, but its leaves are somewhat smaller and have only three leaflets. The stems of the common lespedeza plants I found across the sidewalk were also woodier than the stems of the creeping indigo.

Identification of any toxic plant is the first step in its control. For your next move, mechanical control may be a feasible option if the population is small when you find it. If you pull or hoe the plants, make sure you destroy any seeds as well as the plants. Seed can be viable surprisingly early and the stem and leaves remain toxic after they die and dry. The plant has a deep tap root, so mechanical control can be challenging.

Chemical control has not been established, but GrazonNext HL at 24 oz. per acre may be effective as it has good control of other legumes. Remember the dead plants in your pasture are still a threat. Manure from animals grazing treated pastures or hay from treated should not be used for compost.

Inspect your pastures and lawns for creeping indigo and other toxic plants. Your livestock and your neighbor’s livestock rely on your vigilance. If you suspect you have creeping indigo in your pastures, contact your local County Agent for assistance in identification and management.

This plant has been a problem in South and Central Florida and much good information on specifics of toxicity and symptoms .
Sharon Gamble. Creeping Indigo (Indigo spicata) - Toxic to Livestock www.volusia.org/core/fileparse.php/4179/urlt/Creeping-Indigo.pdf
Dr. Rob MacKay. Creeping Indigo Toxicity largeanimal.vethospitals.ufl.edu/2014/11/03/creeping-indigo-toxicity/
Sellers, Carlisle and Wiggins. South Florida Beef Forage Program. Creeping Indigo: A Small, Yet Lethal Plant sfbfp.ifas.ufl.edu/articles/article_2013_june.shtml

Please spread the word to fellow livestock owners and neighbors. Post it however you deem appropriate. This is a problem we want to avoid if at all possible.

Contact me if you have any questions.

Jed

Jed Dillard
Jefferson County Livestock and Natural Resources Agent
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
2729 West Washington
Monticello, FL 32344
850-342-0187
...

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Triple R Horse Rescue Tallahassee shared Pony Espresso's photo. ...

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A big shout-out of thanks to the nine Boy Scouts from Troop 201 who participated in a Horsemanship Clinic at the Leon County Horseman's Assoc. arena on July 30th — and then donated $80 to Triple R Horse Rescue. We and the horses appreciate your thoughtfulness. Thank you, Boy Scouts!!! ...

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This is a COURTESY POST.

Four year old Arabian mix gelding, 14.5 hands, utd on all shots, has had one month professional training and is a great spirited and smart horse. However he has bucked when spooked.
Owner Ima G. Millender, who can no longer care for him, says she promised him when she rescued him he would never be hungry again. "Please help me carry out my promise," she asks..
Located 15 miles north of Carrabelle. If interested in getting more information, send Ima a FB message or email her at harlibelleima@aol.com
...

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A big thank you goes out to Taylor Nelson, who asked her friends to donate to Triple R for her 11th birthday. She raised $100 for us and our horses are VERY appreciative. We've had a lot of medical bills to pay lately and every dollar helps.
Thank you Taylor!!!
Here are photos of:
Taylor riding her horse, Charlie, and her sister, Natalie, riding her pony, Razzle,
Taylor and her friends who donated -- Cassie, Mallory, Kristina, Kendall, Haley, Emily, Natalie
And the letter that Taylor sent to Triple R with her donation
...

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Beautifully done. Many of you will appreciate this. ...

Here is the Just A Horse video. The person who created this video is unknown.

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